The Gospel of Cheese
lellaria:


it’s nice to not be alone

{i’d like to petition for kunoichi as main characters 2014}

lellaria:

it’s nice to not be alone

{i’d like to petition for kunoichi as main characters 2014}

arandadill:


Said the lord unto his lady as he rode over the moss, “Beware of Long Lankin that lives amongst the gorse. Beware the moss, beware the moor, beware of Long Lankin. Be sure the doors are bolted well lest Lankin should creep in.”

Illustration for Long Lankin Folk Song, a classic boogeyman tale. Done for Fantasy Illustration class.

arandadill:

Said the lord unto his lady as he rode over the moss,
“Beware of Long Lankin that lives amongst the gorse.
Beware the moss, beware the moor, beware of Long Lankin.
Be sure the doors are bolted well lest Lankin should creep in.”

Illustration for Long Lankin Folk Song, a classic boogeyman tale. Done for Fantasy Illustration class.

Do yourself a favor. Learn to code. Here’s how.

rubitrightintomyeyes:

boomeyer:

I’ve said this to my non-techie friends countless times. It’s no secret that being able to code makes you a better job applicant, and a better entrepreneur. Hell, one techie taught a homeless man to code and now that man is making his first mobile application.

Learning to code elevates your professional life, and makes you more knowledgeable about the massive changes taking place in the technology sector that are poised to have an immense influence on human life.

(note: yes I realize that 3/5 of those links were Google projects)

But most folks are intimidated by coding. And it does seem intimidating at first. But peel away the obscurity and the difficulty, and you start to learn that coding, at least at its basic level, is a very manageable, learnable skill.

There are a lot of resources out there to teach you. I’ve found a couple to be particularly successful. Here’s my list of resources for learning to code, sorted by difficulty:

Novice

Never written a line of code before? No worries. Just visit one of these fine resources and follow their high-level tutorials. You won’t get into the nitty-gritty, but don’t worry about it for now:

Dash - by General Assembly

CodeAcademy

w3 Tutorials (start at HTML on the left sidebar and work your way down)


Intermediate

Now that you’ve gone through a handful of basic tutorials, it’s time to learn the fundamentals of actual, real-life coding problems. I’ve found these resources to be solid:

Khan Academy

CodeAcademy - Ruby, Python, PHP

Difficult

If you’re here, you’re capable of building things. You know the primitives. You know the logic control statements. You’re ready to start making real stuff take shape. Here are some different types of resources to turn you from someone who knows how to code, into a full-fledged programmer.

Programming problems

Sometimes, the challenges in programming aren’t how to make a language do a task, but just how to do the task in general. Like how to find an item in a very large, sorted list, without checking each element. Here are some resources for those types of problems

Talentbuddy

TopCoder

Web Applications

If you learned Python, Django is an amazing platform for creating quick-and-easy web applications. I’d highly suggest the tutorial - it’s one of the best I’ve ever used, and you have a web app up and running in less than an hour.

Django Tutorial

I’ve never used Rails, but it’s a very popular and powerful framework for creating web applications using Ruby. I’d suggest going through their guide to start getting down-and-dirty with Rails development.

Rails Guide

If you know PHP, there’s an ocean of good stuff out there for you to learn how to make a full-fledged web application. Frameworks do a lot of work for you, and provide quick and easy guides to get up and running. I’d suggest the following:

Cake PHP Book

Symfony 2 - Get Started

Yii PHP - The Comprehensive Guide

Conclusion


If there’s one point I wanted to get across, it’s that it is easier than ever to learn to code. There are resources on every corner of the internet for potential programmers, and the benefits of learning even just the basics are monumental.

If you know of any additional, great resources that aren’t listed here, please feel free to tweet them to me @boomeyer.

Best of luck!

Another good thing to check out: Harvard offers free online classes in Computer Science! You can pay to have your work evaluated for college credit or just follow along with the lectures and lessons for free. I have been working through the first lesson in my spare time and it is a fun and informative introduction to programming. I recommend it to anyone interested in getting a better understanding of coding!

arandadill:

Raincoat Cat rescues actual cat from the rain.

arandadill:

Some women simply defy gravity.

arandadill:

Some women simply defy gravity.

mari-m-art:

Polish time n___n

'cause all those GLTAS reblogs make me nostalgic.

And I was listening to Tommy James’s Crimson and Clover while drawing this *wink wink* XDDD

"my my such a sweet thing… what a beautiful feeling…"

rubitrightintomyeyes:

schwarznarr:

I want to talk to you all about HabitRPG.  HabitRPG is probably the greatest thing that I’ve found.  I actually found it awhile ago, but I didn’t think I had any habits, or couldn’t think of anything worthwhile to put in there, until now.
Right now, I’m using this for NaNoWriMo to help me build in rewards, but the more I thought about it, the more I realized it was going to be so helpful for me in all aspects of my life.  Truly.
I’ve seen a lot of posts about making those ‘You did it’ stars for the simplest tasks that are made difficult when you have depression, or other mental illnesses.  As I thought about those, I suddenly realized that HabitRPG is great for those too.
Struggle to shower every day (I know I do, it’s probably the worst part of my day, IF I do it at all).  Make it a daily reward, and you get experience and money if you do it, and penalized if you don’t.  Not quite ready to be penalized if you don’t do the task?  Then just make it a habit and set it to reward only.
Have things you should do (homework assignments, calling your parents), put them under the To Do List.
Have things you already have as habits and want to get rewarded for anyway?  I read at least 30 minutes every single day.  I want to be rewarded for that.
Similarly, I’m trying to build up a habit for exercising, so I made it both a daily and a habit.  I want to get penalized if I don’t do at least 10 minutes per day of some kind of exercising or running, or fitness, yoga, whatever.  BUT, if I do more than my 10 minutes, I damn well want to be rewarded.
Right now, for me, my rewards are simple and kind of lame… But, I haven’t really figured everything I need or want out of this.
I wrote this post kind of poorly, but I just wanted to share how amazing I think this program is.  It’s just, urgh.  It’s fab.  It’s the incentive I need because it’s something I already love (gaming), so, yeah. … …

Reblogging because I’ve been doing Habit for a few months now and it has done a better job than anything else I’ve tried at helping me cut down on procrastination and stick to my goals of personal improvement. Since I’ve started in January I’ve taught myself 95.5% of Spanish comprehension on Duolingo, completed seven online courses in various modeling and illustration programs on Lynda, and have committed to drawing for fun every day.
Also check out how fucking rad my level 50 warrior looks:

rubitrightintomyeyes:

schwarznarr:

I want to talk to you all about HabitRPG.  HabitRPG is probably the greatest thing that I’ve found.  I actually found it awhile ago, but I didn’t think I had any habits, or couldn’t think of anything worthwhile to put in there, until now.

Right now, I’m using this for NaNoWriMo to help me build in rewards, but the more I thought about it, the more I realized it was going to be so helpful for me in all aspects of my life.  Truly.

I’ve seen a lot of posts about making those ‘You did it’ stars for the simplest tasks that are made difficult when you have depression, or other mental illnesses.  As I thought about those, I suddenly realized that HabitRPG is great for those too.

Struggle to shower every day (I know I do, it’s probably the worst part of my day, IF I do it at all).  Make it a daily reward, and you get experience and money if you do it, and penalized if you don’t.  Not quite ready to be penalized if you don’t do the task?  Then just make it a habit and set it to reward only.

Have things you should do (homework assignments, calling your parents), put them under the To Do List.

Have things you already have as habits and want to get rewarded for anyway?  I read at least 30 minutes every single day.  I want to be rewarded for that.

Similarly, I’m trying to build up a habit for exercising, so I made it both a daily and a habit.  I want to get penalized if I don’t do at least 10 minutes per day of some kind of exercising or running, or fitness, yoga, whatever.  BUT, if I do more than my 10 minutes, I damn well want to be rewarded.

Right now, for me, my rewards are simple and kind of lame… But, I haven’t really figured everything I need or want out of this.

I wrote this post kind of poorly, but I just wanted to share how amazing I think this program is.  It’s just, urgh.  It’s fab.  It’s the incentive I need because it’s something I already love (gaming), so, yeah. … …

Reblogging because I’ve been doing Habit for a few months now and it has done a better job than anything else I’ve tried at helping me cut down on procrastination and stick to my goals of personal improvement. Since I’ve started in January I’ve taught myself 95.5% of Spanish comprehension on Duolingo, completed seven online courses in various modeling and illustration programs on Lynda, and have committed to drawing for fun every day.

Also check out how fucking rad my level 50 warrior looks:

image

Do yourself a favor. Learn to code. Here’s how.

boomeyer:

I’ve said this to my non-techie friends countless times. It’s no secret that being able to code makes you a better job applicant, and a better entrepreneur. Hell, one techie taught a homeless man to code and now that man is making his first mobile application.

Learning to code elevates your professional life, and makes you more knowledgeable about the massive changes taking place in the technology sector that are poised to have an immense influence on human life.

(note: yes I realize that 3/5 of those links were Google projects)

But most folks are intimidated by coding. And it does seem intimidating at first. But peel away the obscurity and the difficulty, and you start to learn that coding, at least at its basic level, is a very manageable, learnable skill.

There are a lot of resources out there to teach you. I’ve found a couple to be particularly successful. Here’s my list of resources for learning to code, sorted by difficulty:

Novice

Never written a line of code before? No worries. Just visit one of these fine resources and follow their high-level tutorials. You won’t get into the nitty-gritty, but don’t worry about it for now:

Dash - by General Assembly

CodeAcademy

w3 Tutorials (start at HTML on the left sidebar and work your way down)


Intermediate

Now that you’ve gone through a handful of basic tutorials, it’s time to learn the fundamentals of actual, real-life coding problems. I’ve found these resources to be solid:

Khan Academy

CodeAcademy - Ruby, Python, PHP

Difficult

If you’re here, you’re capable of building things. You know the primitives. You know the logic control statements. You’re ready to start making real stuff take shape. Here are some different types of resources to turn you from someone who knows how to code, into a full-fledged programmer.

Programming problems

Sometimes, the challenges in programming aren’t how to make a language do a task, but just how to do the task in general. Like how to find an item in a very large, sorted list, without checking each element. Here are some resources for those types of problems

Talentbuddy

TopCoder

Web Applications

If you learned Python, Django is an amazing platform for creating quick-and-easy web applications. I’d highly suggest the tutorial - it’s one of the best I’ve ever used, and you have a web app up and running in less than an hour.

Django Tutorial

I’ve never used Rails, but it’s a very popular and powerful framework for creating web applications using Ruby. I’d suggest going through their guide to start getting down-and-dirty with Rails development.

Rails Guide

If you know PHP, there’s an ocean of good stuff out there for you to learn how to make a full-fledged web application. Frameworks do a lot of work for you, and provide quick and easy guides to get up and running. I’d suggest the following:

Cake PHP Book

Symfony 2 - Get Started

Yii PHP - The Comprehensive Guide

Conclusion


If there’s one point I wanted to get across, it’s that it is easier than ever to learn to code. There are resources on every corner of the internet for potential programmers, and the benefits of learning even just the basics are monumental.

If you know of any additional, great resources that aren’t listed here, please feel free to tweet them to me @boomeyer.

Best of luck!

ittygittydiddynator:

anderjak:

toastradamus:

Roger Rabbits special effects still fucking hold up by todays standards AND looks better than most films that come out NOW it was that ahead of its time

I’m still amazed that Hoskins had that little to work with. Everything about this video is awesome.

This made my day.